have


have
have, hold, own, possess, enjoy are comparable when they mean to keep, control, retain, or experience as one's own.
Have is the most general term and in itself carries no implication of a cause or reason for regarding the thing had as one's own
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he has considerable property

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they have five children

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we have no cow at present

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have opinions on a subject

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she has many friends

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they are going to have a baby

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he has no French

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we shall have some trouble with it

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Hold implies stronger control over than have and usually suggests a grasp upon, an occupancy of, or a bond between; thus, "to have friends" implies a mere amicable relationship, but "to hold one's friends" implies either the reducing of them to subjection or the retaining of their affection; "to have an opinion" implies merely the existence of that opinion, whereas "to hold an opinion" usually suggests its assertion
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hold extensive properties in New York State

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once did she hold the gorgeous East in fee— Wordsworth

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the Breton seized more than he could hold; the Norman took less than he would have liked— Henry Adams

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the receptive imagination . . . holds fast the visions genius creates— Eliot

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Own implies a natural or legal right to hold as one's property and under one's full control
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own a house

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own several horses

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when a child is old enough, he should ... be allowed to own books— Russell

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some parents treat their children as if they owned them

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Possess is preferred in law to own as implying one's having full title and right to a particular property to the exclusion of everyone else; thus, a husband and wife might say that they own a piece of land when legally only the husband possesses it. In general use possess differs from own in being referable to other things than property (as a characteristic, a quality, a power, or a faculty)
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possess contentment

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the States possessed the power to exclude or admit them [slaves]— John Marshall

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that astonishingly retentive memory which we possessed as little boys— Inge

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the great medicinal value possessed by this water— Heiser

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Enjoy (see also LIKE) implies the having of something as one's own or for one's use with all its benefits and advantages; in this sense there is no necessary connotation of pleasure or delight in having or using, but, except in law, the word often does carry a hint if not a definite suggestion of it
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during his lifetime he enjoyed a distinguished reputation for the excellence of his sermons— T. S. Eliot

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while man enjoyed ... an unlimited freedom to be wicked— Henry Adams

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classes that enjoy certain rights and privileges

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Contrasted words: want, *lack, need

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

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  • hâve — hâve …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • have — [ weak əv, həv, strong hæv ] (3rd person singular has [ weak əz, həz, strong hæz ] ; past tense and past participle had [ weak əd, həd, strong hæd ] ) verb *** Have can be used in the following ways: as an auxiliary verb in perfect tenses of… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • have — [hav; ] also, as before [ “] to [ haf] vt. had [had; ] unstressed [, həd, əd] having [ME haven (earlier habben) < OE habban, akin to OHG haben, ON hafa, Goth haban < IE base * kap , to grasp > Gr kaptein, to gulp down, L capere, to take …   English World dictionary

  • Have — (h[a^]v), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Had} (h[a^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Having}. Indic. present, I {have}, thou {hast}, he {has}; we, ye, they {have}.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. h[ae]fde, p. p. geh[ae]fd); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • have — (h[a^]v), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Had} (h[a^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Having}. Indic. present, I {have}, thou {hast}, he {has}; we, ye, they {have}.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. h[ae]fde, p. p. geh[ae]fd); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • have — (h[a^]v), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Had} (h[a^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Having}. Indic. present, I {have}, thou {hast}, he {has}; we, ye, they {have}.] [OE. haven, habben, AS. habben (imperf. h[ae]fde, p. p. geh[ae]fd); akin to OS. hebbian, D. hebben,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • hâve — [ av ] adj. • 1548; frq. °haswa « gris comme le lièvre » ♦ Amaigri et pâli par la faim, la fatigue, la souffrance. ⇒ émacié, 1. maigre. Gens hâves et déguenillés. Visage, teint hâve. ⇒ blafard, blême. ⊗ CONTR. 1. Frais, replet. hâve adj. Litt.… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • have — 1. For the type ☒ No state has λ or can adopt such measures, see ellipsis 3. 2. In a sentence of the type Some Labour MPs would have preferred to have wound up the Session before rising, the present infinitive is preferable, i.e. Some Labour MPs… …   Modern English usage

  • have — ► VERB (has; past and past part. had) 1) possess, own, or hold. 2) experience; undergo: have difficulty. 3) be able to make use of. 4) (have to) be obliged to; must. 5) perform the action indicated by the noun …   English terms dictionary

  • have — (v.) O.E. habban to own, possess; be subject to, experience, from P.Gmc. *haben (Cf. O.N. hafa, O.S. hebbjan, O.Fris. habba, Ger. haben, Goth. haban to have ), from PIE *kap to grasp (see CAPABLE (Cf. capable)). Not related to L …   Etymology dictionary


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